Posts tagged with fashion.

lavandula:

j.w. anderson spring.summer 15, collaboration with textile artist john allen
July 20 201410·32 pm4,190 notes

lavandula:

j.w. anderson spring.summer 15, collaboration with textile artist john allen

(via bostondparty)

knitalicious:

OMG this. This is the most perfect knitted dress I have ever seen. Absolutely stunning. Seriously. Whoa.
http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/evenstar-shawl
June 13 201409·00 am2,185 notes

knitalicious:

OMG this. This is the most perfect knitted dress I have ever seen. Absolutely stunning. Seriously. Whoa.

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/evenstar-shawl

(via holycrapyarnandstuff)

#knitting   #clothes   #fashion   #dress   #lace  
fashionsfromhistory:

Child’s Coat
1550-1600
Turkey & Hungary

The mente - a kind of overcoat - was a typical piece of the Hungarian noblemen’s outfit worn over the dolman in the 16th-17th century. The mente surviving in the Esterházy collection was probably worn by a boy at the age of about 10 years. The cut adopts the pattern of Turkish kaftans. At the hips it is widened by inserts. The long sleeves (“pipe-sleeves”) reaching down to the bottom of the garment are only for decoration; the arms were stuck through the openings at the shoulders. There is a broad turned-down collar. 
The fabric is one of the most finely and proportionately patterned specimens of the most expensive Turkish court silk lampas fabrics (kemha) interwoven with gold and silver threads. The pattern is in the 75 “four-flower” style typical of the Turkish cloths of the period, comprising lines of mandorlas including carnation, rose, tulip and lotus flower. The child’s mente was probably retailored from another garment, as the collar of several pieces and the slightly askance direction of the pattern on the back suggest. Sources reveal that using clothes of valuable fabrics - this time perhaps a Turkish gala kaftan (hil’at) received as a gift - were used for skirts, mente lining, children’s attire or ecclesiastic vestments. Tradition has it that the mente was worn by archbishop of Esztergom Miklós Olah (1493-1568), but recent researches prove that the fabric was produced in the second half of the 16th century the earliest, so the archbishop could not wear it in his childhood. It was probably to enhance the magnificence of the family that the Esterházy’s associated the garment with this notable personage of the past.

Museum of Applied Arts Budapest
June 09 201406·31 pm242 notes

fashionsfromhistory:

Child’s Coat

1550-1600

Turkey & Hungary

The mente - a kind of overcoat - was a typical piece of the Hungarian noblemen’s outfit worn over the dolman in the 16th-17th century. The mente surviving in the Esterházy collection was probably worn by a boy at the age of about 10 years. The cut adopts the pattern of Turkish kaftans. At the hips it is widened by inserts. The long sleeves (“pipe-sleeves”) reaching down to the bottom of the garment are only for decoration; the arms were stuck through the openings at the shoulders. There is a broad turned-down collar.

The fabric is one of the most finely and proportionately patterned specimens of the most expensive Turkish court silk lampas fabrics (kemha) interwoven with gold and silver threads. The pattern is in the 75 “four-flower” style typical of the Turkish cloths of the period, comprising lines of mandorlas including carnation, rose, tulip and lotus flower. The child’s mente was probably retailored from another garment, as the collar of several pieces and the slightly askance direction of the pattern on the back suggest. Sources reveal that using clothes of valuable fabrics - this time perhaps a Turkish gala kaftan (hil’at) received as a gift - were used for skirts, mente lining, children’s attire or ecclesiastic vestments. Tradition has it that the mente was worn by archbishop of Esztergom Miklós Olah (1493-1568), but recent researches prove that the fabric was produced in the second half of the 16th century the earliest, so the archbishop could not wear it in his childhood. It was probably to enhance the magnificence of the family that the Esterházy’s associated the garment with this notable personage of the past.

Museum of Applied Arts Budapest

May 27 201407·19 pm269 notes

lightsharpnesssong:

Knitting Inspiration - New Year, New Skills Part 1 - Brioche Knitting

I’ve seen this sort of thing cropping up a lot lately, and while it didn’t really strike my fancy at first, I think it’s grown on me quite a bit. It could be that I spent so many months heavily focused on texture, or that I’ve been making striped things recently, but I think what’s more likely is that my process knitter side wants a challenge. In the past year I’ve done a lot of new-to-me things and found myself muchly grown as a person as a result. It’s really that feeling of learning and accomplishment that I find most inspiring right now, so I’m going to dedicate the next few weeks to sharing a bunch of knitting things I’ve not yet attempted with the goal of having a learning experience with you.

Brioche knitting is Part 1 in this series only because it shares its name with a pastry (mmm…delicious word associations). I actually know nothing about it beyond its visual impact, so I’ve taken the liberty of pulling in some quick internet research (yes, I know that Wikipedia is hardly “research,” but I’m not getting graded on this)

Brioche knitting is a family of knitting patterns involving tucked stitches, i.e., yarn overs that are knitted together with a slipped stitch from the previous row. Such stitches may also be made by knitting into the row below (equivalent to the slipped stitch) and dropping the stitch above (equivalent to the yarn over).

The basic stitch of brioche knitting is the brioche-knit stitch, or the bark stitch (abbreviated “brk”), which consists of a knit-stitch knitted together with its “wrap,” a yarnover from the previous row. The brioche-purl stitch (or the burp stitch (abbreviated “brp”) is the same only for purling.

Each bark or burp stitch is followed by a yarn-front, slip-one, yarnover (yf-sl1yo). This sets up the bark and burp stitches for the next row.

In brioche knitting, it takes two “passes” to complete a single row of knitting, since only half the stitches are knitted each time. The other half are slipped. For this reason, it takes more knowledge to be able to count rows and stitches and measure gauge.

It’s made of barks and burps? WTF? Slipped stitches are familiar to me, but this whole business of tucked stitches and crazy extra yarnovers is just not clicking. I think I need a visual aid. 

Webs has a video that shows just the basic brioche knit stitch. What the hell? Are those backwards yarnovers in there? 

Here are two tutorials that manage to give instructions for a very simple brioche scarf without any barks or burps. This makes a lot more sense to me than the video tutorial, but that could have something to do with how distracting I find right-handed knitting.

Ahhhh, here’s a tutorial for brioche knitting in the round. Very clear photographs of barks and burps.

Okay, this is starting to make some kind of sense. I wonder if the two-color version just involves switching colors every other row. This works more or less like other slipped stitch knitting, right?

Right! Just like other slipped stitch colorwork.

It also helps to know how to decrease and increase.

This is looking a lot less incomprehensible to me now. In fact, I think I’m probably ready to just cast on something and learn by doing it (really the most effective learning strategy for someone as visual/kinesthetic as I am). Unfortunately, that will have to wait a couple of days until I’m done with my last gift knit, but I don’t mind if you want to get a head start.

Sources are, as always, in the captions. Fort those of you who employ some sort of wizardry to view tumblr on your mobile device, they are also below.

Frost on Leaves

Under Dutch Skies

Sushi Ushi Scarf

Lakedale

Berwick

Zandloper

(via intotheomelette)

May 25 201410·50 pm247 notes

austereblackcat:

FO: Suke-Suke Cowl (aka the purple blob). Made for and gifted to my mom for Mother’s Day, this cowl design is wonderfully deceptive. It looks awful for 90% of the time you’re knitting it, and then you drop a few stitches and it turns out fantastic. My skeins were also slightly mismatched, with one a little more pink than the other, and it gives the cowl a bit of an accidental gradient effect. I also love that it’s reversible!

(via intotheomelette)

#knitting   #cowl   #fashion   #clothing  
emelieabergh:

Reversible Lavender Crop Top and Skirt with small pockets full of lavender to reduce stress when wearing the garments. 
Fabric: My watercolor print on organic cotton sateen, upcycled and vintage closures
Model: Carly
Photo by: Anthony Fusco
Part of my sustainable grant project, 2014
May 02 201409·51 pm63 notes

emelieabergh:

Reversible Lavender Crop Top and Skirt with small pockets full of lavender to reduce stress when wearing the garments. 

Fabric: My watercolor print on organic cotton sateen, upcycled and vintage closures

Model: Carly

Photo by: Anthony Fusco

Part of my sustainable grant project, 2014

(via tangerinefleur)