Posts tagged with fashion.

September 01 201410·30 am21 notes

k-ni-t:

Collaboration between Philippa Hill and Marie Leiknes. Using devore, foiling, screen print on knitting for the Heim collection A/W 2013

(via intotheomelette)

fashionsfromhistory:

Skirt
1875-1900
Romania 
MET
August 05 201410·01 am53 notes

fashionsfromhistory:

Skirt

1875-1900

Romania 

MET

130186:

Dolce & Gabbana S/S 2013
August 02 201412·32 pm653 notes

130186:

Dolce & Gabbana S/S 2013

(via craftwitch)

lavandula:

j.w. anderson spring.summer 15, collaboration with textile artist john allen
July 20 201410·32 pm6,624 notes

lavandula:

j.w. anderson spring.summer 15, collaboration with textile artist john allen

(via bostondparty)

knitalicious:

OMG this. This is the most perfect knitted dress I have ever seen. Absolutely stunning. Seriously. Whoa.
http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/evenstar-shawl
June 13 201409·00 am2,214 notes

knitalicious:

OMG this. This is the most perfect knitted dress I have ever seen. Absolutely stunning. Seriously. Whoa.

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/evenstar-shawl

(via holycrapyarnandstuff)

#knitting   #clothes   #fashion   #dress   #lace  
fashionsfromhistory:

Child’s Coat
1550-1600
Turkey & Hungary

The mente - a kind of overcoat - was a typical piece of the Hungarian noblemen’s outfit worn over the dolman in the 16th-17th century. The mente surviving in the Esterházy collection was probably worn by a boy at the age of about 10 years. The cut adopts the pattern of Turkish kaftans. At the hips it is widened by inserts. The long sleeves (“pipe-sleeves”) reaching down to the bottom of the garment are only for decoration; the arms were stuck through the openings at the shoulders. There is a broad turned-down collar. 
The fabric is one of the most finely and proportionately patterned specimens of the most expensive Turkish court silk lampas fabrics (kemha) interwoven with gold and silver threads. The pattern is in the 75 “four-flower” style typical of the Turkish cloths of the period, comprising lines of mandorlas including carnation, rose, tulip and lotus flower. The child’s mente was probably retailored from another garment, as the collar of several pieces and the slightly askance direction of the pattern on the back suggest. Sources reveal that using clothes of valuable fabrics - this time perhaps a Turkish gala kaftan (hil’at) received as a gift - were used for skirts, mente lining, children’s attire or ecclesiastic vestments. Tradition has it that the mente was worn by archbishop of Esztergom Miklós Olah (1493-1568), but recent researches prove that the fabric was produced in the second half of the 16th century the earliest, so the archbishop could not wear it in his childhood. It was probably to enhance the magnificence of the family that the Esterházy’s associated the garment with this notable personage of the past.

Museum of Applied Arts Budapest
June 09 201406·31 pm245 notes

fashionsfromhistory:

Child’s Coat

1550-1600

Turkey & Hungary

The mente - a kind of overcoat - was a typical piece of the Hungarian noblemen’s outfit worn over the dolman in the 16th-17th century. The mente surviving in the Esterházy collection was probably worn by a boy at the age of about 10 years. The cut adopts the pattern of Turkish kaftans. At the hips it is widened by inserts. The long sleeves (“pipe-sleeves”) reaching down to the bottom of the garment are only for decoration; the arms were stuck through the openings at the shoulders. There is a broad turned-down collar.

The fabric is one of the most finely and proportionately patterned specimens of the most expensive Turkish court silk lampas fabrics (kemha) interwoven with gold and silver threads. The pattern is in the 75 “four-flower” style typical of the Turkish cloths of the period, comprising lines of mandorlas including carnation, rose, tulip and lotus flower. The child’s mente was probably retailored from another garment, as the collar of several pieces and the slightly askance direction of the pattern on the back suggest. Sources reveal that using clothes of valuable fabrics - this time perhaps a Turkish gala kaftan (hil’at) received as a gift - were used for skirts, mente lining, children’s attire or ecclesiastic vestments. Tradition has it that the mente was worn by archbishop of Esztergom Miklós Olah (1493-1568), but recent researches prove that the fabric was produced in the second half of the 16th century the earliest, so the archbishop could not wear it in his childhood. It was probably to enhance the magnificence of the family that the Esterházy’s associated the garment with this notable personage of the past.

Museum of Applied Arts Budapest