Posts tagged with fabric.

fashionsfromhistory:

Ritual Textile
18th Century

This textile is an excellent example of an object which has travelled in distance and time during its lifespan. At the same time it has acquired several new meanings. It was produced in Northwest India as a commodity for export to Indonesia in the 18th century. Among the To Kaili people in Central Sulawesi it was classified a “precious cloth”, not worn daily, but preserved as a family valuable and used as a ritual textile. Later on it was transferred to Finland and became part of the museum’s collection. Now this item´s biography refers to the great Indian textile tradition, trade between India and Indonesia, the religious and social life among the To Kaili people in Sulawesi and the Finnish missionary work in Indonesia.
This Indian textile was acquired by a Finnish Salvation Army officer, Edvard Rosenlund (1895–1939), in Bora, Central Sulawesi (Celebes), Indonesia in 1922– 1928. Rosenlund worked in Central Sulawesi 1919–1928 and collected about 500 objects, took photos, made a film and wrote several newspaper articles about the local culture. According to Rosenlund “The most antique piece of cloth that I have been able to get hold of there. It has formerly been the property of the powerful prince of Sigi. Nowadays it represents capital. At great festivals they hang up such antique pieces of cloth under which the priestesses perform their dances. The price of this piece was earlier 7 slaves and 7 buffaloes. Acquired at Bora. Provenance unknown.”

Suomen kansallismuseo via the VCM
September 11 201410·55 am103 notes

fashionsfromhistory:

Ritual Textile

18th Century

This textile is an excellent example of an object which has travelled in distance and time during its lifespan. At the same time it has acquired several new meanings. It was produced in Northwest India as a commodity for export to Indonesia in the 18th century. Among the To Kaili people in Central Sulawesi it was classified a “precious cloth”, not worn daily, but preserved as a family valuable and used as a ritual textile. Later on it was transferred to Finland and became part of the museum’s collection. Now this item´s biography refers to the great Indian textile tradition, trade between India and Indonesia, the religious and social life among the To Kaili people in Sulawesi and the Finnish missionary work in Indonesia.

This Indian textile was acquired by a Finnish Salvation Army officer, Edvard Rosenlund (1895–1939), in Bora, Central Sulawesi (Celebes), Indonesia in 1922– 1928. Rosenlund worked in Central Sulawesi 1919–1928 and collected about 500 objects, took photos, made a film and wrote several newspaper articles about the local culture. According to Rosenlund “The most antique piece of cloth that I have been able to get hold of there. It has formerly been the property of the powerful prince of Sigi. Nowadays it represents capital. At great festivals they hang up such antique pieces of cloth under which the priestesses perform their dances. The price of this piece was earlier 7 slaves and 7 buffaloes. Acquired at Bora. Provenance unknown.”

Suomen kansallismuseo via the VCM

(via fashionsfromhistory)

#ritual   #cloth   #fabric   #weaving  
August 20 201412·18 pm17,518 notes

teavibes:

elizabethlovatt:

Bee Quilt

The material has been hand dyed with turmeric, tea and onions skins. Then hand printed with lino cuts to represent the larvae, workers, drones and the single queen bee. The quilt was then then pieced, quilted and bound by hand.

The bees are arranged in a rough imitation of the structure of a hive: the queen is surrounded by workers, each drone and larvae are attended by their own workers, while others form a circle to represent a “bee dance” and some stand guard at the entrance to the hive.

I wanna make this!

(via jbe200quilts)

#bees   #quilts   #fabric   #sewing  
August 19 201411·53 am4,309 notes

geddion:

a—fri—ca:

Adinkra symbols

The Adinkra are visual symbols, originally created by the Ashanti of Ghana and the Gyaman of Cote d’Ivoire in West Africa, that represent concepts or aphorisms. Adinkra are used extensively in fabrics, pottery, logos and advertising. They are incorporated into walls and other architectural features. 

The symbols have a decorative function but also represent objects that encapsulate evocative messages that convey traditional wisdom, aspects of life or the environment. There are many different symbols with distinct meanings, often linked with proverbs. They were one of the means for the transmission of a complex and nuanced body of practice and belief.

Adinkra symbols

********

Photo 1 > Africa

Photo 2 > Adinkra symbols

Photo 3 > Site

(via heirloomrug)

#afican   #adinkra   #ghana   #dyeing   #symbols   #fabric  
August 03 201411·14 pm4 notes

pippaaustin:

Leaf Print and contrast pleat.

#leaves   #nature   #fabric   #sewing   #pleats  
June 24 201412·39 pm243 notes

alisongamm:

the final layout. 

(via jbe200quilts)

#quilt   #color porn   #fabric   #sewing  
May 25 201403·36 pm8,831 notes

ifthisisawoman:

Jim Hodges at the Walker Art Center

Untitled (one day it all comes true), 2013

denim fabric, thread

(via lalakelbel)

#painting   #denim   #sewing   #fabric  
April 27 201410·29 pm108 notes

weftwarp:

Lotus Yarn, Myanmar

Cool in summer and warm in winter, lotus fabric is highly breathable and wearable year-round. With a texture similar to raw silk and linen, lotus fabric is soft, lightweight and naturally waterproof.

- Julie Hall

#lotus   #plant   #thread   #weaving   #cloth   #fabric