Posts tagged with fabric.

warpandweftblog:

(The super-rainy) Day 3 of wearing @thehill_side ‘s hemp denim sneakers is up on warpandweftblog.tumblr.com, and later today I’ll be talking about this 114-year old “Irish stitch” quilt that my great-grandmother made, back when grandmas did that kind of stuff. #thehillside #quilt #vintage #menswear #textiles #handmade
April 13 201408·24 pm11 notes

warpandweftblog:

(The super-rainy) Day 3 of wearing @thehill_side ‘s hemp denim sneakers is up on warpandweftblog.tumblr.com, and later today I’ll be talking about this 114-year old “Irish stitch” quilt that my great-grandmother made, back when grandmas did that kind of stuff. #thehillside #quilt #vintage #menswear #textiles #handmade

(via jbe200quilts)

eccentrickollector:

© Michelle Griffiths - Aizome 1 Japanese art of shibori
March 30 201401·17 am33 notes

eccentrickollector:

© Michelle Griffiths - Aizome 1 
Japanese art of shibori

(via textilesystematisms)

#shibori   #japan   #indigo   #fabric   #dyed  
tothestreetswithstyle:

Dries Van Noten | Fabric Room
March 29 201409·53 am240 notes

tothestreetswithstyle:

Dries Van Noten | Fabric Room

(Source: luxelabels, via greycardigans)

bitofbohemia:

Windblow ~ a quilt by Maria Elkins
March 26 201409·38 am69 notes

bitofbohemia:

Windblow ~ a quilt by Maria Elkins

(via jbe200quilts)

#quilt   #fabric   #sewing   #portrait  
March 17 201410·27 pm20 notes

melodiebenford:

Healing Quilts in Medicine: Art quilts making a difference in the lives of patients and their families

Fiber Artists @ Loose Ends collaborated with the Center for Organogenesis and the Gifts of Art program to deliver quilts based on scientific images from University of Michigan scientists.

1. Green Feather (Annabel Ebersole). This quilt (left) is based on the photo of a lobule of the cerebellum (right) by Maria Morrell, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Cell & Developmental Biology, University of Michigan

Located at the lower back of the brain, the cerebellum is a fist-sized structure that contains more neurons than all of the rest of the brain combined. In this section of a highly folded lobule, astrocytes (green) support large specialized neurons, the Purkinje cells (red). The blue nuclear staining illustrates the many cells present in each of the lobules. Cerebellar neural stem cells are located next to the Purkinje cells. 

The quilt uses fabric and fiber to represent parts of the cells of the cerebellum. Silk throwster’s waste, silk cocoon fibers, silk Sari yarn from Nepal, glitter threads, cotton, rayon and silk threads, stamp pads, paint, stencils, wool yarn, hemp string, rubber string, metallic grid and various fabrics, both hand and machine stitched, were used to create these effects. 

2. Sunburst (Bunnie Jordan). This quilt (right) is an interpretation of a micrograph (left) of neural stem cells by Maria Morrell.

In this photomicrograph, the spherical cluster of neural stem cells was stained to identify a protein typically found in astrocytes (red). The nuclei of the cells have been stained blue. The goal of our research is to study the potential of neural stem cells for repair after injury to the central nervous system. A prism design and a class from the artist Barbara Olson was the starting point for designing the quilt. The techniques used include fused and machine appliqué incorporating yarns, organza, netting and beads.

3. Gastric Rainbow (Carole Nicholas, Judy Busby, Christine Adams, Bunnie Jordan, Paula Golden, Sandi Goldman, Barbara Hollinger, Mary Lois Davis, Annabel Ebersole). The quilt (left) is based on the image (right) by Jochen Lennerz, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO and Jason Mills, M.D., Ph.D University of Washington at St. Louis.

This is a section of a mouse stomach. Food will be digested in the black area at the top of the picture. The large green cells in the middle of the image produce stomach acid, while the cells at the bottom (highlighted in magenta) make digestive enzymes. The red cells at top line the surface of the stomach and secrete mucus. The mucus barrier protects these beautiful stomach cells from self-digestion.

Nine artists independently interpreted a 10” section. Techniques are varied: fusing, raw edge appliqué, free-motion quilting, machine embroidery, silk waste overlay, zigzagged and turned edges. Materials; 100% cottons (also batiks, and artist dyed), Swarovski beads, acrylic paint, and watercolor pencils.

Healing Quilts in Medicine of Sacred Threads is dedicated to projects that bring beauty and education through art quilts into hospitals. This is the vision of Judy House who, before she died of breast cancer, organized a group of 37 art quilters to make art quilts based on the plants and animals used in chemotherapies. More quilts can be viewed at The Healing Quilts in Medicine website.

(via jbe200quilts)

#medicine   #science   #quilt   #thread   #fabric   #healing  
roachpatrol:

redjeep:

retrogasm:

When they realized women were using their sacks to make clothes for their children, flour mills started using flowered fabric for their sacks. The label was designed to wash out.

1939 Kansas Wheat…

holy fuck that’s the cutest marketing scheme i’ve ever heard of 
'buy our flour it's going to make the nicest bread and the sweetest dress!’ 
yes thank you ok sold
February 26 201409·17 am86,703 notes

roachpatrol:

redjeep:

retrogasm:

When they realized women were using their sacks to make clothes for their children, flour mills started using flowered fabric for their sacks. The label was designed to wash out.

1939 Kansas Wheat…

holy fuck that’s the cutest marketing scheme i’ve ever heard of 

'buy our flour it's going to make the nicest bread and the sweetest dress!’ 

yes thank you ok sold

(via eternal-evolution)

February 21 201406·47 pm10,945 notes

teaganwhite:

My fabric collection, Fort Firefly, is now available for purchase! I worked with Birch Fabrics to create this line of playful woodland-inspired organic cotton fabrics featuring tree forts, campfires, fireflies, foxes, deer, raccoons, bunnies, and a girl named Penny. I’ll post some photos of the physical fabric this weekend too, so you can get an idea of how it looks in person.

You can buy fabric by the 1/2 yard on Fabricworm, or order it wholesale directly from Birch Fabrics. Also check out the cute craft project tutorials using the fabrics on Birch’s blog! If you order any fabric and do something cool with it, please let me know and send some photos my way! I’ll be collecting all ideas & tutorials on a Pinterest board so that anyone looking for ideas can find them in one place.

Thanks for all of your enthusiastic responses about the collection! I’m happy to be able to share it with you!

(via mythoughtfulwindow)

#fabric   #printed   #cute