September 17 201404·20 pm287,324 notes

loodletooboodleroodlesoodle:

mangomartyr:

loodletooboodleroodlesoodle:

santullianal:

This honestly made me tear up. Imagining how great he must have felt that his planned worked and choosing that risk paid off.
I also feel like him and the model have such good chemistry, they’re always so kind and loving to one another.

Holy shit what did he do?? That’s rad as hell!

Since the runway was going to have simulated rain, he wanted to make the outfit become colorful because of it rather than deflect it. He sewed dye into the seams and once the rain hit it the dye ran! Very simple but super effective. He was one of the two winners of that challenge.

Absolutely brilliant. Holy shit.

(via craftwitch)

fashionsfromhistory:

Ritual Textile
18th Century

This textile is an excellent example of an object which has travelled in distance and time during its lifespan. At the same time it has acquired several new meanings. It was produced in Northwest India as a commodity for export to Indonesia in the 18th century. Among the To Kaili people in Central Sulawesi it was classified a “precious cloth”, not worn daily, but preserved as a family valuable and used as a ritual textile. Later on it was transferred to Finland and became part of the museum’s collection. Now this item´s biography refers to the great Indian textile tradition, trade between India and Indonesia, the religious and social life among the To Kaili people in Sulawesi and the Finnish missionary work in Indonesia.
This Indian textile was acquired by a Finnish Salvation Army officer, Edvard Rosenlund (1895–1939), in Bora, Central Sulawesi (Celebes), Indonesia in 1922– 1928. Rosenlund worked in Central Sulawesi 1919–1928 and collected about 500 objects, took photos, made a film and wrote several newspaper articles about the local culture. According to Rosenlund “The most antique piece of cloth that I have been able to get hold of there. It has formerly been the property of the powerful prince of Sigi. Nowadays it represents capital. At great festivals they hang up such antique pieces of cloth under which the priestesses perform their dances. The price of this piece was earlier 7 slaves and 7 buffaloes. Acquired at Bora. Provenance unknown.”

Suomen kansallismuseo via the VCM
September 11 201410·55 am106 notes

fashionsfromhistory:

Ritual Textile

18th Century

This textile is an excellent example of an object which has travelled in distance and time during its lifespan. At the same time it has acquired several new meanings. It was produced in Northwest India as a commodity for export to Indonesia in the 18th century. Among the To Kaili people in Central Sulawesi it was classified a “precious cloth”, not worn daily, but preserved as a family valuable and used as a ritual textile. Later on it was transferred to Finland and became part of the museum’s collection. Now this item´s biography refers to the great Indian textile tradition, trade between India and Indonesia, the religious and social life among the To Kaili people in Sulawesi and the Finnish missionary work in Indonesia.

This Indian textile was acquired by a Finnish Salvation Army officer, Edvard Rosenlund (1895–1939), in Bora, Central Sulawesi (Celebes), Indonesia in 1922– 1928. Rosenlund worked in Central Sulawesi 1919–1928 and collected about 500 objects, took photos, made a film and wrote several newspaper articles about the local culture. According to Rosenlund “The most antique piece of cloth that I have been able to get hold of there. It has formerly been the property of the powerful prince of Sigi. Nowadays it represents capital. At great festivals they hang up such antique pieces of cloth under which the priestesses perform their dances. The price of this piece was earlier 7 slaves and 7 buffaloes. Acquired at Bora. Provenance unknown.”

Suomen kansallismuseo via the VCM

(via fashionsfromhistory)

#ritual   #cloth   #fabric   #weaving  
September 07 201411·03 pm63 notes

knittingcountess:

makinology:

top picture …man acts as swift as woman knits, 1817….
what is a ‘swift’ ? :

A swift is a tool used to hold a hank of yarn while it is being wound off. It has an adjustable diameter so that it can hold hanks of many sizes, and rotates around a central rod.They are generally made out of wood or metal, however other materials may also be used. In the 18th and 19th centuries, swifts were sometimes made of whale ivory and they are now sought-after antiques. Swifts are not used very much in the textile industry, but are used more by knitters and crocheters who buy their yarn in hank form. The swift allows for easy balling, without the yarn getting tangled and knotted.”  ~wikipedia

similarly, & for the same purpose, to make sure the yarn or fiber doesn’t become tangled, are the ‘spinner’s weasel’ (shown above) & the ‘niddy noddy’ (shown above & in ‘madonna of the yarnwinder’) …

Swifts are indeed very useful to have.  I have had mine for over 25 years!

(via intotheomelette)

#swifts   #history   #art  
fastknitter:

LucciolaS’s “Peacock mittens”
(via Ravelry)
September 04 201401·12 am141 notes

fastknitter:

LucciolaS’s “Peacock mittens”

(via Ravelry)

(via intotheomelette)

#knitting   #clothing   #mittens   #hats   #fair isle   #lace  
September 01 201410·30 am21 notes

k-ni-t:

Collaboration between Philippa Hill and Marie Leiknes. Using devore, foiling, screen print on knitting for the Heim collection A/W 2013

(via intotheomelette)

leaves-underfoot:

Quill Box circa 1830 - Mi’kmaq Resource Centre
August 23 201412·32 am67 notes

leaves-underfoot:

Quill Box circa 1830 - Mi’kmaq Resource Centre

(Source: , via weftwarp)

#quills   #basketry   #box  
August 20 201412·18 pm17,529 notes

teavibes:

elizabethlovatt:

Bee Quilt

The material has been hand dyed with turmeric, tea and onions skins. Then hand printed with lino cuts to represent the larvae, workers, drones and the single queen bee. The quilt was then then pieced, quilted and bound by hand.

The bees are arranged in a rough imitation of the structure of a hive: the queen is surrounded by workers, each drone and larvae are attended by their own workers, while others form a circle to represent a “bee dance” and some stand guard at the entrance to the hive.

I wanna make this!

(via jbe200quilts)

#bees   #quilts   #fabric   #sewing